4 ways to trick your brain into learning faster

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Fast learning is possible for everyone. You don’t need to be a genius in order to understand something new. Whether it is a new technology or a new skill you’re trying to acquire, these are proven methods everyone can use to learn and retain the information faster, easier and pretty much better.

These tricks don’t need to be applied in any order in order for them to work, and you can practice them with pretty much any subject or skill you’re trying to learn. Whether it is painting or learning a language, you just need to remember to be constant and don’t give up.

Shorter studying sessions

While a studying marathon may sound like an excellent idea in order to learn things in a shorter period of time, it can actually be worst for you. Studies suggest you start by breaking down study sessions in chunks of 30-50 minutes in order to be more productive.

Studying less than 30 minutes is not very useful, and by the time you've passed the 50 minutes mark you tend to slack off more, get distracted easier and generally have a harder time retaining all that new information. Big study sessions can, and most likely will, lead to burnout. Also spacing out these studying sessions can help you overcome procrastination.

Connect concepts

When you’re learning a new topic, practicing a new skill, or even learning a language, it is key to identify concepts and connect them to things you already know and understand. Also look for how every part of the thing you’re learning relate. Trying to put things in context can help you a lot.

This can be put in practice in a number of different ways. For example, when you’re trying to learn a new language visual aid can be decisive. It is not the same to look at a thing when you learn its name than to just trying to picture it in your mind. This is why most language-learning programs use drawing or pictures in order to give you context and visualize it better.

The same can be applied when drawing and painting. Use the basics of what you already know and apply them to this new technique you’re trying to learn.

Find out what really matters

Before starting to learn a new thing it is useful to identify what are the key aspects of it, find out what you really need to know, what's important and what isn't. This helps you when dividing your learning sessions by contents. This way you can learn what really matters first and leave all the annoying details for a later learning session.

The ability to identify what you do and do not know is called "metacognition", a key part of the learning process. Try to write out what you already know on the subject you're learning about to compare and see what you really need to learn, what's new and what isn't.

Teach someone

Teaching is an excellent way of learning. It will prove your knowledge and your ability to connect the ideas that are entering into your brain and how to turn them into a simple explanation.

Einstein once said, “If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough”. Keep this in mind, then go ahead and teach, or at least try to pretend to do so. You will soon find out the quickest, most simple and easiest way to understand and tackle a subject.

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